Drought Conditions

When you see a map of Massachusetts colored in bright orange, this is not a cute reference to the coming blaze of autumn leaves. No, the fiery shade refers to the “critical drought” that affects the state and others in New England. Seven months of below-average rainfall have left lawns yellow, ponds dried up, and residents must abide by restrictions on watering their gardens.

When you see a map of Massachusetts colored in bright orange, this is not a cute reference to the coming blaze of autumn leaves. No, the fiery shade refers to the “critical drought” that affects the state and others in New England. Seven months of below-average rainfall have left lawns yellow, ponds dried up, and residents must abide by restrictions on watering their gardens.

The USDA’s Economic Research Center reported recently that “drought conditions were most severe in the States of California, Texas, Oregon, Nevada, Utah, and New Mexico. “According to USDM on July 11, 2022, a third of all land in the western states was classified as experiencing extreme or exceptional drought. In total, forty states are currently drought-stricken.

What to do? With an increasing population, the basic need for water will just increase, no matter whether climate change exacerbates the situation or not.

The other day we had a sewage backup. In our building, no one could turn on a faucet or flush a toilet for two days till the problem was solved. This brought to mind just how much water we waste each day without thinking. Running the hot water tap till it reaches a comfortable temperature is one prime cause of wastage. Safety concerns have created this problem. The stated reason for this is to avoid scalding. But perhaps that occasional risk is less dangerous than running out of life-giving water.

My father, who grew up in outback Australia, the aridest country on earth, had a simple solution. In his family, every drop of water had to be used at least three times — for cooking, for washing, and then for watering. It seems a little extreme to use water that’s boiled vegetables to wash in, but drinking it after it is cooled might add nutrients! In the meantime, I keep my half-drunk water glasses and throw the saved water on my plants.

Simplest of all – we should tell restaurant servers to stop automatically filling our water glasses. Most people don’t drink it all and by health regulations, the water must then be thrown out.

Let’s get creative, people, about what we can do to make our precious water last!

Let's Be Social

Join Our Community

Sign up to receive email for the latest information.

Search