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Margaret Ann Spence > BLOG > My Writing

Now For The Thank Yous

As I go into launch week for my debut novel, Lipstick on the Strawberry, I want to thank everyone who helped it happen.

First, (and they all know this) my wonderful, wonderful writer’s group, led by the generous and insightful Marylee MacDonald. I’ve been in writers’ groups before, but this group is by far the most productive and supportive. We’ve produced several books between us in the past few years and more are in the pipeline.

Secondly, The Wild Rose Press. This amazing small publisher has a devoted stable of authors. Why devoted? Because TWRP creates a community amongst its writers with weekly online chats, a very active marketing director who answers questions promptly and kindly even though she must be asked the same question a thousand times over, and a fabulous editorial team, including my own editor Sherri Good. And Debbie Taylor, the cover artist, created a cover which exactly captures the essence of the book.

Thirdly, the talented Kristen Burkhart Ferhati, who designed my website and helps this technologically challenged writer put up the blog.

Finally, my friends and family, particularly my dearest John, my husband, for their interest, support, and patience as I birthed this fourth baby of mine (The others are human. I could have told you that characters in books don’t answer you back, but that is actually not true. Those pesky characters often surprise the author and do exactly what they want – just like human offspring!)

I’ve also been honored to be a guest on several author blogs. So if you would like to pop over to the delightful Peggy Jaeger’s site, Writing Is My Oxygen, please do. She’s featuring an interview with me on Wednesday, 6th July.
Also check out Bonnie McCune’s blog, Ordinary People, Extraordinary Lives. My piece, Jury Duty, appeared on Bonnie’s site in February.

August 15, I’ll be engaging with fellow women’s fiction writers at the WFWA’s Launch Party and also appearing on the writer and photographer Clancy Tucker’s charming blog.
 
July 4 falls on a Tuesday this year and many people are taking an extra-long weekend. Enjoy, and eat an extra serving of ice-cream. Strawberry of course. 🍓

Lipstick Launches!

Lipstick on the StrawberryI am so excited that my book, Lipstick on the Strawberry, will be officially launched by The Wild Rose Press on July 5! Its been wonderful to work with this small publisher, which has consistently been named best book publisher by author websites.

People always ask me about what my title means. Photographers do weird things to make food more visually appetizing. They spritz a cake with hairspray, decorate a pie with shaving cream, and swipe a pale strawberry with lipstick to make it glisten. When I learned that, I knew I had my book title. My caterer protagonist, Camilla, always felt unable to live up to her family’s expectations. After returning to England for her father’s funeral, she finds that beneath the veneer of respectability lie imperfection and secrets.

Here’s an excerpt, to give you the flavor:

My fingers searched the back of the drawer and felt something glossy. I pulled, and saw in my hand a colored photograph of a woman who looked to be about the age I was now. She had hair the color of fallen leaves. Only the woman’s shoulders were visible below the head, she was wearing a scarf of blue and green, which reflected the color of her laughing eyes. In the background was the blurred green of a field. I flicked the photo over. The penciled initials N.B. were the only notation.

A cold prickle ran down my back as I stared at it. I tucked the photo into my pocket. How peculiar was it to find this woman’s image stuffed in the back of a drawer? Daddy had gone to pains to hide the picture. In one hand, I lifted the plastic bags of trash, picked up the passport in the other, and went to find Tilda.

“Would you mind if I went home and rested?” I asked. “I feel a headache coming on.”

“Yes, of course. What did you find in there? Oh, good, Daddy’s passport. I’d like to keep that. How thoughtful of you. Anything else of interest?”

I turned so Tilda couldn’t see and fingered the pocketed photo. The letters N.B. intrigued me. Was this just the acronym to remind our father of something important? Or did it mean something else?

Lipstick on the Strawberry, by Margaret Ann Spence, available at The Wild Rose Press, Amazon, nook, bookstrand, kobo and itunes.

What Makes A Book Cover Great?

Lipstick on the Strawberry“A truly great jacket is one that captures the book inside it in some fundamental and perhaps unforeseen way,” says writer Kyle Vanhemert in Wired Magazine’s September 23, 2014 article, “What Makes for a Brilliant Book Cover? A Master Explains“.

When my manuscript of Lipstick on the Strawberry was still at the querying stage last year, I learned that it was a finalist in the Author U’s novel competition. As a result, I got to go to the Denver, Colorado, conference put on annually by Judith Briles, the brilliant author mentor and publicist.

The Author U conference is primarily for self-published authors, and among the panel discussions was one on designing a book cover. A writer held up his jacket, which featured a skimpily clad, twenty-something woman brandishing a rifle. A male fantasy, no doubt. Independent publishing expert Amy Collins (newshelves.com) asked the author who this book was written for. He replied, “Soccer moms.”

Ms. Collins asked him if he was open to suggestions on the cover, and the writer said, “Possibly.”

To which Amy Collins replied, “That’s like telling a cancer doctor you’d be open to chemotherapy.” After the nervous laughter died down, she continued, “Authors have no business designing a book cover. Leave that to the professionals.”

I’m pleased to tell you that my book jacket has been designed by a true professional, Debbie Taylor, an artist working for my publisher, The Wild Rose Press. It is exactly what I had in mind, except for one thing.

It is even better than I anticipated.

In my cover, the lipstick and the strawberry dominate, but the addition of a cup with smudged lipstick next to the strawberries and lipstick adds mystery, a sense of something interrupted, and the hint of imperfection to this serene scene.

Which captures the theme of my book. Exactly.

I hope you’ll want to read Lipstick on the Strawberry when it is released in July 2017.

Thank you to The Wild Rose Press.

How Book Club Questions Can Help The Author As She Writes

My experience with book clubs has been enjoyable, but as guides to reading fiction, they’ve tended to go off the point. Depending on the quality of the food, or let’s just blame the wine (both always necessary!), the discussion meanders into participants' marital problems, politics, or neighborhood gossip. Great, bonding evenings. Many book groups have lasted for years. It matters little if participants like the book or pan it, the novel is often just the excuse for getting together. That’s all wonderful, and was for me, too, until a friend suggested me that being a writer must spoil the experience of reading, because it would become too analytical. Not true. I can get swept up in the power of good prose just as much as I ever did. It’s just that now I know that every sentence did not get there by magic – it was planned. Now that I review fiction and try to write it as well as I can, I’ve found that “book club questions” (for those that actually ask them) really help in thinking about a novel. I found these from a site called LitLovers.com. The most interesting thing for me as a writer, is that these questions sharpened my thinking about how to put a story together, or at an even earlier stage, how to pre-write a novel. LitLovers.com questions 1, 4 and 7 are questions only the reader can answer. But as a writer I can see I have to ask questions 2, 3, 5, 6, and 8 before I even put a word to paper. Do these questions help you in figuring out how a novel works? 1. How did you experience the book? Were you engaged immediately, or did it take you a while to “get into it”? How did you feel reading it—amused, sad, disturbed, confused, bored…? 2. Describe the main characters—personality traits, motivations, and inner qualities. • Why do characters do what they do? • Are their actions justified? • Describe the dynamics between characters (in a marriage, family, or friendship). • How has the past shaped their lives? • Do you admire or disapprove of them? • Do they remind you of people you know? 3. Are the main characters dynamic—changing or maturing by the end of the book? Do they learn about themselves, how the world works and their role in it? 4. Discuss the plot: • Is it engaging—do you find the story interesting? • Is this a plot-driven book—a fast-paced page-turner? • Does the plot unfold slowly with a focus on character? • Were you surprised by complications, twists & turns? • Did you find the plot predictable, even formulaic? 5. Talk about the book’s structure. • Is it a continuous story… or interlocking short stories? • Does the time-line move forward chronologically? • Does time shift back & forth from past to present? • Is there a single viewpoint or shifting viewpoints? • Why might the author have chosen to tell the story the way he or she did? • What difference does the structure make in the way  you read or understand the book? 6. What main ideas—themes—does the author explore? (Consider the title, often a clue to a theme.) Does the author use symbols to reinforce the main ideas? (See the free LitCourses on both Symbol and Theme.) 7. What passages strike you as insightful, even profound? Perhaps a bit of dialog that’s funny or poignant or that encapsulates a character? Maybe there’s a particular comment that states the book’s thematic concerns? 8. Is the ending satisfying? If so, why? If not, why not… and how would you change it? Thanks, LitLovers.com for putting together this thoughtful list!

AuthorU – Helping Writers

It was a beautiful few days in Denver at the AuthorU Extravaganza September 15-17. Writers, publishers and vendors enjoyed three days of networking and information sessions. The most useful for me were the workshops on social media. But it was not all work. We ate delicious food and enjoyed a play performed by best-selling women’s fiction author and Days of Our Lives actress Mara Purl and actor Christopher Law. Judith Briles, “The Book Shepherd” founder of the writer support group AuthorU had shattered her shoulder in a fall the week before. This did not stop her from running the conference with her usual energy and charm. Best of all, for me, was that my novel, Lipstick On The Strawberry, was a finalist in the “Draft to Dream” Book Competition. The competition for unpublished manuscripts is judged by a panel of librarians. I make myself blush by repeating what the judges said about my story – but then again I want you to buy it when it is published. Here’s a sample of the judge’s comments: “The quality of the writing drew me into the story immediately…” “She is an excellent writer. She has a great ability to create the scene and describe character…” “The writing style…is very fluid, and it’s just good writing…a pleasure to read it.” So that’s enough bragging for now. Above is the photo of the certificate. Three cheers for Judith Briles and AuthorU!

Plots and Plotting

Cambridge University Botanic GardenJust got back from a trip to Europe. Spent the last few days in Cambridge, England. My photos reflect the cool gray rain-filled skies. My novel, Lipstick On The Strawberry, is set partly in Cambridge. There’s a scene in the beautiful Cambridge University Botanic Garden. As I walked that garden the other day, I thought, a good novel is like a well-planned garden. No wonder the word “plot” is used for both books and gardens. In the Cambridge University Botanic Garden, gravel and woodchip paths wind past a pond, rock gardens, formal lawns and beds of flowers in full bloom. Trees, strategically planted, obscure the planting beds around corners, drawing the visitor forward to see what is around the bend. That’s what I hope readers will do with my novel – turn the page to see what happens next!