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Margaret Ann Spence > BLOG > 2020 > January

A Fundraiser for the Australian Fires

My publisher, The Wild Rose Press, has authors from all over the world. Perhaps unique among publishers, it encourages friendship between its authors through an email loop.

One of the writers is Stephen B. King of Western Australia. He has been keeping us apprised of the bushfire situation in Australia. As we know from daily television and news reports, the bushfires have raged up and down the East Coast, and the West Coast as well, taking human lives, killing millions if not billions of insects, birds and animals, and causing choking smoke to pollute the major cities.

About three weeks ago, Steve floated an idea: What if the authors of The Wild Rose Press were to put together an anthology of short stories and to donate all profits? Within 24 hours, he had offers for short stories from 40 authors, and by a few days later there were 48 of us with stories ready. There were so many stories offered that the press decided to create three volumes.

The publisher acted swiftly. Contracts were sent out in record time, the editors volunteered to copy edit and proof read, a brilliant cover was created, and a release date of February 14 was anticipated.

It all went so well to plan, with such enthusiasm all around, that Volume One was released this week. Australia Burns – Show Australia Some Love is advertised on Amazon for $13.99.

However, in order to avoid any profit being made on this book by third parties, could you kindly purchase this book through the publisher at HERE.

My story, The Ring, is in Volume One.

Volumes Two and Three will be forthcoming. The entire project is a voluntary one and all profits will be donated.

As far as I know, The Wild Rose Press is the only publisher to make such a contribution. Rhonda Penders and R.J. Morris, owners of the press, deserve accolades for this superb feat of organization and quick turn-around, and gratitude for their generosity. And to all the authors as well, a huge thank you from this Australian. Their outpouring of support has been incredible.

To everyone who has wondered how they can help, this is a wonderful way. And you’ll enjoy the read!

Why Little Women Endures: How A Woman Who Hated Sex Keeps Us Reading

The new movie, Little Women, is on my to-see list. It reminded me of an article I wrote in 2018 about how that book influenced me to become a writer. Here it is: How Childhood Reading Shapes Identity. That article has been retweeted continuously since publication – a testament to Alcott’s evocation of family life and the psychological complexities of the thinking of girls on the cusp of womanhood.

I am not alone in wondering if Alcott’s enduring hold on the imagination of girls and women is her very complicated, not to say confusing, attitude to sex. Jo, the future writer, rejects the handsome boy next door, Laurie, because she wants to be an author. We understand from the subtext that she thinks she can only write without being a wife and mother. Then Alcott has her marry a much older man. At first, Jo thinks Professor Bhaer is an intellectual companion, but then he belittles her literary aspirations, and they go on to run a school together, a school for boys. Jo’s writerly aspirations are set aside.

Historians say that Alcott’s publisher pushed her into making Jo marry. Alcott seems to be putting up a little rebellion by creating a character in Bhaer that is quite unattractive. This conflict is at the heart of the story.

Alcott’s own childhood of genteel poverty led her to a dim view of a man’s ability to support his family. Her own father was an idealist who could not, and the household was held together by her mother, and later, Louisa herself. She seemed unable to imagine a true partnership of a man and a woman where respect and passion comingle. That aspiration, so dearly held by girls today as a real possibility, drives the book’s popularity. It is an aspiration still very far from reality for
many women.

I read Little Women first at the age of eleven. That is a magic age for girls, or was for me. It is a time when I felt I could do anything, aspire to anything. That was before puberty, when girls feel the pressure to attract the opposite sex. When advertising suggests that they are not worthy unless they spend time, energy and money on their appearance. Alcott seems to be saying that that a career should trump those concerns. But sacrificing one for the other is not what girls want, in my experience. The psychological battle continues for woman’s lifetime. That’s why Little Women has us flocking to the movie theatres.