Margaret Ann Spence Coming Home
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Lithuanian Roots in American Soil

Lithuanian Roots in American SoilBy Audrone Barunas Willke and Danute Barunas
Amazon CreateSpace
2nd edition, 2015

Refugees are again in the news. But the dislocations of World War II left millions homeless and stateless.

In this riveting memoir, Audrone Willke and her sister, Danute Barunas, describe their trans-Atlantic move to Boston as small children in a Lithuanian family. Interweaving her own memories with the memoirs of her father, we get a picture of what life was like for new immigrants to the United States in the middle part of the last century.

Lithuania, had been part of the Russian empire under the czars, but during World War I it was occupied by Germans, and the villages impoverished. At the end of the war, the country had a brief period of independent democracy from 1918 to 1926. In World War II Lithuania was taken over by the Soviets. Mass deportations to Siberia occurred, and members of the Barunas family were among the victims. In 1941 the Nazi’s occupied the country, and after they lost war, Lithuania was once again in the hands of the Russians. In this atmosphere of fear, poverty, and hunger, Audrone and Danute’s parents educated themselves and married. As the Germans started to retreat from Lithuania towards the end of 1944, and the Soviets pushed towards Lithuania, the population feared a new reign of terror under Stalin. So the family escaped by train to Germany where bombings and extreme hunger awaited them. Finally, the war ended and they went to a displaced persons’ camp. By now a family with four children, the Barunas’ were lucky to find a sponsor in Brockton, Massachusetts, and emigrated at the end of 1949.

The second half of the book describes how a non-English speaking family can find work, buy a house, educate their children, and assimilate in a country that accepts them willingly. Audrone met her husband, Dr. Klaus Willeke, a German immigrant, at Stanford University when both were studying for their doctorates. Now a retired professor, Dr Willike’s book shows what immigrants offer to a culture. Her story is a testament to an America that once was, and that could be, again.

Summertime and the Living is Easy

Hedgehog SliceIt is mid-July, the very height of summer in the US.

Vacation season, or in my case, party time! Sunday we made brunch for about fifteen friends and neighbors. Among the recipes I debuted was this “hedgehog slice”. A childhood treat in Australia, my home country, I had never made it before.

Channeling my creative caterer protagonist, Camilla, in Lipstick on the Strawberry, I managed to combine a couple of recipes, swapping grams for ounces, and a slight change of ingredients to come up with this winner! I hope you like it.

By the way, I have absolutely no idea how this dessert treat got its name. Like most wonderful recipes, the first hedgehog probably came about when guests were expected with short notice and the inventive cook had to source from whatever she had to hand. Made of crushed cookies, condensed milk, coconut, butter, nuts and chocolate, it looks nothing like a hedgehog. It is utterly scrumptious.

Here’s the recipe:

Ingredients
I package, or 2 ½ cups mild flavored cookies, roughly broken up
½ cup shredded coconut
2 tbs cocoa powder
½ cup chopped walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecans
3 blocks 70% cocoa content bittersweet chocolate, 4 oz each, divided in two
½ cup butter, salted or unsalted, depending on taste, divided in two
1 cup sweetened condensed milk – i.e. one small can

Method
Prepare a brownie pan by lining bottom and sides with parchment paper, making sure there is
enough paper to hang over the side of the pan to make removal easy.

Crush the cookies in a food processor, or place in a zip-lock bag and crush with a rolling pin till
they are the texture of breadcrumbs

In a large bowl, stir the crushed cookies together with the cocoa powder, coconut and chopped
nuts.

In a microwave -safe bowl, break up half the chocolate, and mix with half the butter and the
condensed milk. Heat until melted and creamy, stopping the microwave to stir frequently.
This should take about two minutes. Or use the old-fashioned method of heating in a double
boiler over a pan of simmering water, and stirring until melted, 5-8 minutes.

Pour the melted mixture over the dry ingredients and mix with a spatula until it all comes
together. When everything is covered with the chocolate/butter cream, pour it all into the
prepared pan, and smooth with the side of the spatula.

Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes, or until firm. When ready to proceed with making the
topping, remove the pan from the fridge.

Now make the chocolate topping: Place ¼ cup butter and the rest of the chocolate in a bowl
and microwave until melted and creamy. Or double boil it as above.

Pour the topping over the hedgehog, smoothing it completely. Cover with plastic wrap and put
back in the fridge for at least one hour or overnight.

To serve, lift up the parchment paper with the hedgehog mix inside and place on a chopping
block. Carefully score the surface into vertical and horizontal strips, as if you were cutting
brownies. Cut carefully into small squares. Take up from the parchment paper and arrange the
squares decoratively on a plate to serve.

Lily Campbell’s Secret

Lily Campbell’s SecretBy Jennifer Bryce

Rightword Publishing, 2019

It is 1913, and seventeen-year-old schoolgirl Lily discovers she is pregnant.

Unmarried motherhood is a social sin that was unforgiveable in that time, but this book takes off in an unexpected way. Lily, an upper-middle class girl with a private school education, with a promising position at the Music Conservatory awaiting her, does not wish her baby away. She’s in love with her boyfriend, Bert,a stable hand with a love of animals, and they marry, happily, and have a baby girl, Edith. Not that things are easy. Lily has no idea how to run a house and her horrified parents shun her.

Then the world erupts in World War 1 and Bert enlists. When he returns, he is changed utterly. Lily has to cope with a man with a head injury so severe he needs round the clock help. There’s no money, and Lily must cope as a wage-earner, carer, and mother. How she does this, and the choices she faces, propel the book along to its shocking conclusion.

This book captures all the senses, as well as historical details that all ring true as the author evokes life in a country town. The war is remote, yet its aftermath reverberates throughout the lives of all who lived in the era, and beyond. That’s why this is a timeless story. Jennifer Bryce captures the heartbreak and helplessness of PTSD and brain injury for the victim and their families. With very appealing main characters, Lily, Bert, and Edith, and a well-drawn cast of supporting characters, this book draws the reader in and won’t let go. I could not put this book down. Please read it.