Margaret Ann Spence Coming Home
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First Anniversary Sale!

Ever since I was a kid who wrote a “novel” in a blue exercise book, complete with hand-done drawings, I wanted to see a book of mine in actual print.

Last summer, that happened.

It was an amazing feeling to see Lipstick on the Strawberry in print, with its gorgeous cover, designed by Debbie Taylor of The Wild Rose Press. Thanks to everyone who has been so supportive, have written reviews (so important to authors) or have written me a personal note.

I’m especially tickled by the fact that though I consider women to be the book’s target readers, a number of men have commented on how they enjoyed it. They even liked the recipes!

To celebrate the anniversary, the e-book is on sale from August 17-31!
ONLY 99 CENTS!


The Wild Rose Press

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

iBooks (Apple)

The Ones We Choose


By Julie Clark

Simon & Schuster, 2018

The urge to procreate is profound. It’s driven by the genes of every living thing. In the past few years our knowledge of the human genome has revolutionized science, and reproductive technology also advances relentlessly. In this fascinating debut novel, Julie Clark combines both themes. When a geneticist has a baby by an unknown father, can she ever feel secure?

Surrogacy, egg donation, and IVF have all brought the joy of parenthood to countless people who thought they could never have a baby. There is one technology that it old hat by comparison – sperm donation. There are men who donate semen for money or for altruistic reasons. Women who do not have a partner or whose partner is infertile can select donor semen and become pregnant. If they use a sperm bank they never know who sired the child.

This is the story of Paige Robson and her charming, funny, clever eight-year-old, Miles. Paige almost left the baby boat behind because she’s been so damaged by her own childhood that she’s built a wall up around herself. That’s immediately apparent in the opening pages of this book, but Julie Clark’s characterization is so deft that this reader liked Paige immensely, and adored her son. Clark is an elementary school teacher by profession and her descriptions of PTA meetings, a “drill sergeant” third grade teacher, and playground bullies are often hilarious. Her rendering of Miles and his heartbreaking wish to know who his father is centers the novel.

There are so many layers to this book beyond the paradox that Clark poses at the beginning. Paige’s own Dad has been largely absent from her childhood, and this fuels her anger. But she then chooses to create a child who will never know his father. In Clark’s writerly hands, this
makes sense. As the novel progresses, a tragedy happens, and another question occurs to the reader. To what extent is our foreknowledge of a future genetic possibility useful, given that life is so unpredictable? Is the passion for control more important than being vulnerable to pain? And should love for a child trump all other relationships?

Julie Clark signals all these questions in her title. The word “Choose” implies control. But how much control do we have over other people and over ourselves?

A most thought-provoking book.