Margaret Ann Spence Coming Home
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Refuge

By Dina Nayeri

Riverhead Books, A Division of Penguin Random House, 2017


What does it take for a child to be taken from her native country as her mother flees persecution, to be a homeless, penniless refugee in America, and then to graduate from Princeton and Harvard, and by the age of 40 to have published two novels and won many writing awards? This is Dina Nayeri’s life story and we get glimpses of the psychological cost of her experiences in this semi-autobiographical novel.

In this riveting story the main narrator is Niloo Hamidi, who, like Nayeri, is the daughter of a fundamentalist Christian mother who fled Iran in 1987. The novel is told in the voice of Niloo and her father, Bahman, who stayed behind.

Bahman is a wonderful character. An exuberant dentist who indulges in chocolate, alcohol, and opium, he chose not to leave Iran with his wife. He didn’t want to leave his respected profession, his ancestral village in Isfahan, his house and his drug habit. The novel hinges on the four visits Bahman made to his family through 2009. They meet in the United States, Madrid, Istanbul, and Amsterdam. Over time, Bahman sees his daughter change beyond recognition, and her teenaged embarrassment over her father’s behavior hardens. He’s a mess, and she’s tried so hard not to be.

Niloo is married to Guillaume, aka Gui, a wealthy French-American (the nicest man, she tells her father, and he is). They live in Amsterdam. That’s significant, because an anti-Muslim politician is on the rise, and the city is crowded with refugees who have no visas, no jobs, and no hope. The marriage seems tenuous, despite’s Gui’s best efforts. This couple can’t understand one another. Niloo both depends on and resents Gui’s assumptions of well-being and financial security (he’s an international lawyer), while she creates boundaries between them. In every place they live she makes a “Perimeter”, a few square feet of personal space to hold her treasures. She’s succeeded in her profession as a paleontologist because she works relentlessly. Gui asks her to “waste time”, i.e. to have fun. Unable to understand this concept, Niloo befriends a community of Iranian refugees. All are trying to get asylum in The Netherlands. Gui offers professional legal help for them; she refuses. It takes her a while to realize that in pushing away her husband and bonding with the refugees she is processing her own childhood experience and learning who she really is.

In the twenty-two years this story encompasses, the Iranian situation has worsened. We see this through Bahman’s courtroom plea for his third divorce. The courtroom scenes, spread over several chapters, are a brilliant authorial device, showing Iranian values and how different they are from Western ones. This novel does not shy away from political truths. And it’s beautifully written.

It’s beyond the scope of this review to unearth the ways in which Nayeri demonstrates the complex self- hatred and conflicted identities of refugees, just as she excavates the feelings of Bahman, who stayed behind, feeling guilty he cannot effect change. Niloo’s academic work involves interpreting the teeth of prehistoric peoples, an interesting choice, given her father’s profession. All humans, Nayeri implies, lived through a full gamut of emotions in turbulent times either never recorded or now forgotten, migrating, and evolving as they did so. But their bones and their teeth tell us of the universality of humanity.

The Pink Heart Society Review

The Pink Heart Society, a new online magazine, published this review of Lipstick On the Strawberry in their August edition.

Estranged from her English family, Camilla Fetherwell now lives in the United States and owns a successful catering business. Returning home for her father’s funeral, she reunites with her first love, Billy, whom she hasn’t seen since her father broke up their teenage romance. Billy seems eager to resume their love affair. But after one blissful night together, things take a turn.

Camilla suspects her father may have led a secret life, and when Billy reveals something he, too, has discovered, her apprehension grows. Billy holds her heart, but their relationship might be tainted by what her father hid. A reunion seems impossible.

Her life feels as splattered as her catering apron. As she watches her food stylist make a strawberry look luscious with a swipe of lipstick, Camilla wonders if a gloss has been put over a family secret? Can she and Billy survive what’s underneath?

Rated: 4.5 Pink Hearts Reviewed by: Tamara JK

“This book kept me awake for 4 nights in a row, and I needed 2 days afterwards to recover. The story develops slowly but never gets boring, with enough detail to prevent you from speeding through the pages in order to savor every word. Camilla is poignantly sad, the events which marked her teenage years leaving an indelible imprint on her adult life. She measures everything by past standards, worrying what the people around her might think of her actions and accomplishments. Then along comes Billy. Years have passed, lots of things have happened, and suddenly they find themselves at a crossroad again. The connection between this lovable couple is very deep and passionate, you feel that they are two parts of one soul. But Camilla has to find the strength to choose her own happiness instead of considering what would everyone else think and as a reader, you soon end up cheering her on.

This was an eye-opening story for me, one that touched me on a personal level, and I will definitely be recommending it to all my reader friends.”

Learn more about The Pink Heart Society.

First Anniversary Sale!

Ever since I was a kid who wrote a “novel” in a blue exercise book, complete with hand-done drawings, I wanted to see a book of mine in actual print.

Last summer, that happened.

It was an amazing feeling to see Lipstick on the Strawberry in print, with its gorgeous cover, designed by Debbie Taylor of The Wild Rose Press. Thanks to everyone who has been so supportive, have written reviews (so important to authors) or have written me a personal note.

I’m especially tickled by the fact that though I consider women to be the book’s target readers, a number of men have commented on how they enjoyed it. They even liked the recipes!

To celebrate the anniversary, the e-book is on sale from August 17-31!
ONLY 99 CENTS!


The Wild Rose Press

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The Ones We Choose


By Julie Clark

Simon & Schuster, 2018

The urge to procreate is profound. It’s driven by the genes of every living thing. In the past few years our knowledge of the human genome has revolutionized science, and reproductive technology also advances relentlessly. In this fascinating debut novel, Julie Clark combines both themes. When a geneticist has a baby by an unknown father, can she ever feel secure?

Surrogacy, egg donation, and IVF have all brought the joy of parenthood to countless people who thought they could never have a baby. There is one technology that it old hat by comparison – sperm donation. There are men who donate semen for money or for altruistic reasons. Women who do not have a partner or whose partner is infertile can select donor semen and become pregnant. If they use a sperm bank they never know who sired the child.

This is the story of Paige Robson and her charming, funny, clever eight-year-old, Miles. Paige almost left the baby boat behind because she’s been so damaged by her own childhood that she’s built a wall up around herself. That’s immediately apparent in the opening pages of this book, but Julie Clark’s characterization is so deft that this reader liked Paige immensely, and adored her son. Clark is an elementary school teacher by profession and her descriptions of PTA meetings, a “drill sergeant” third grade teacher, and playground bullies are often hilarious. Her rendering of Miles and his heartbreaking wish to know who his father is centers the novel.

There are so many layers to this book beyond the paradox that Clark poses at the beginning. Paige’s own Dad has been largely absent from her childhood, and this fuels her anger. But she then chooses to create a child who will never know his father. In Clark’s writerly hands, this
makes sense. As the novel progresses, a tragedy happens, and another question occurs to the reader. To what extent is our foreknowledge of a future genetic possibility useful, given that life is so unpredictable? Is the passion for control more important than being vulnerable to pain? And should love for a child trump all other relationships?

Julie Clark signals all these questions in her title. The word “Choose” implies control. But how much control do we have over other people and over ourselves?

A most thought-provoking book.